A cold and busy winter over as a new season starts..

It’s been a busy last few months at the hatchery and in our representational work at a national level.

The winter was particularly cold this year and this meant that both stripping of broodstock and the development of ova was a good 3 weeks behind normal due to the lower than usual water temperatures. At times the snow was quite a challenge…


Nevertheless we successfully grew on all of the eyed ova required for outside contract work (currently the Ness DSFB project to restore the Upper Garry is the largest of these) as well as growing on all of the Lochy eggs with near 98% survival through to alevin.


The first of the alevins are now only now just beginning to absorb their yolk sacs and they will be introduced to feed over the next few weeks. These fish will be stocked as fed fry based on an electro-fishing survey being undertaken in July to identify poorly populated areas of the catchment.

Meanwhile stocking of fin clipped smolts was undertaken in April and early May. 15,000 fin clipped smolts were released in the Roy and 50,000 fin clipped smolts were released in the main stem River Lochy. The latter fish were treated with the infeed anti-sealice medicine SLICE which should give them 6 weeks protection from infestation as they find their way out to sea.

Probably the most important event of the last few months for us has been the Scottish Government’s enquiry into salmon farming. This is due to report some time this summer. We have made sure that the Lochy and surrounding rivers have been at the forefront of their considerations and, as well as written representations, I was invited to give evidence as a witness to the Committee as part of their enquiry. Following this I hosted a site visit for the REC Committee to the River Lochy and Drimsallie Hatchery. These were both very good opportunities to express the view that, while we view fish farming as critically important to the West Coast economy, we do not believe that it is currently being undertaken in suitable locations or that regulation is tight enough to protect migratory fish. So we now all wait to see whether the MSP’s will be brave enough to tackle the problem head on and introduce new measures to see the genuinely sustainable expansion of the fish farming industry.

So as a new season starts we all wait to see what it will bring. Will the spring and early summer run continue the trend of recent years (2017 aside) and continue to increase? Or will the summer and autumn grilse runs improve on recent years? We won’t know unless we are out there with a fly in the water.. so I wish all visiting and local anglers Tight Lines for the season ahead…..and don’t forget to check for those adipose fin clips!

Jon Gibb, Hatchery and Restoration Manager.